mrissa: (Default)
[personal profile] mrissa

Originally published at Novel Gazing Redux. You can comment here or there.

Robert Jackson Bennett, City of Miracles. Gods are apparently like ants in a California apartment complex in this Bennett trilogy: you think you’ve killed them all and there’s always one or two coming back again, so put your miracles in sealed containers. This is definitely a third book of a trilogy, not a stand-alone; I do not at all recommend starting here, but it does end things nicely. (The first book is City of Stairs – ed)

C.J. Cherryh, Convergence. This, on the other hand, is a sawed-off chunk of an ongoing thing. I wrote to another friend who has also read all twenty books of this series with a character’s name in all caps followed by “???” after reading this book. There is plot again, it is not like the trilogy within this series that was essentially focused on Bren getting his apartment back and furnishing it. Is it better for that? I’m not sure. I’m still reading as of book twenty, which tells you something, but for the love of Pete, do not do not DO NOT start here, it will be confusing and boring and generally awful, which it is not when you have read the other nineteen. On the other hand: will you want to read nineteen of these to get to this? I don’t know. It is very much science fiction about alien interactions, and it is very psychologically medieval in ways that I appreciate, and there are moments (like the name in all caps with the ???) where I feel like this is a very long game she has been planning in intricate detail all along and other moments where I am fairly sure it is the equivalent of going out for a morning nature walk with Auntie Carolyn and having her point out which tiny flowers and mushrooms grow under that big leaf and which ones are poisonous (most of them). On the other other hand, I do like nature walks.

Kathryn Evans, More of Me. Discussed elsewhere.

John M. Ford, The Scholars of Night. Reread. I picked this up for my Cold War Fantasy panel, and it is made of love for Christopher Marlowe and Anthony Price and intricacy. It is exactly what this panel is all about, but I reread it not that long ago; I just wanted the excuse.

Natalie Goldberg, Writing Down the Bones. Reread. This is the last of my old Natalie Goldberg books, and honestly it is the one to get if you’re getting a Natalie Goldberg book for a new writer. It is straightforward and cheerful and does not self-aggrandize particularly; it quotes her teachers without acting like they hung the moon, it has ideas for what to do but sort of shrugs through them like, yep, try these and if they don’t work try something else, just try stuff. I am no longer at a point where I think it’s a good use of shelf space for me to keep this book, so I will set it free for some newer writer to enjoy, but it did not make me snippy with Batman the way the others did. (…if you didn’t read that blog post, maybe we should just draw a veil over it.)

Paul Gruchow, Letters to a Young Madman: A Memoir. Gruchow is a Minnesota nature writer and observer of the land, farming, people…he overlaps with my interests enough that I have been reading his books in an essentially random order from the library, and then I came to this one and it blindsided me. Because the present tense in that first sentence is inaccurate. Paul Gruchow. Oh God. Paul Gruchow did not survive his last bout with depression more than a decade ago. I had been darting merrily through feeling so much kinship with this man, and he was gone the whole time I was reading him, painfully and horribly gone, and he suffered so much before he went, and this is the memoir of how. I recommend it under only two circumstances: 1) If you have not read a memoir of depression and mental health treatment and hospitalization in this country. This is a keenly observed and fiercely intelligent example of its genre. It is not heartening. It is not uplifting. It is not the work of a person who managed to find his way out, to see brighter days ahead, to kick at the darkness, as the man said, until it bled daylight. The man I was starting to think of metaphorically as “cousin Paul,” struggled and fought with himself and hurt himself and his family and was hurt by himself and the world, and then he died. This is that book. If you are not yourself depressed and/or have not otherwise experienced the mental health system up close and have not read anyone’s detailed modern account of it, I think you should read at least one, and you could do far worse than letting it be Paul Gruchow’s. You also owe it to yourself to choose very carefully when you subject yourself to it. It does not have to be today, tomorrow, next week. You can look with deliberation when you must look. 2) If you have read such a book before but have come to love the other works of Paul Gruchow, you can choose to look again even if you know the facts and figures of modern mental health care. That would be me. You can see how some of his other stories are changed, cast in different lights, by these stories. By the stories of his illness. You may decide that you don’t want that of a writer whose work you love. And you may decide that you owe it to a writer whose work you love to have his whole work, not to look away. If it was me, I would want some of my readers to look away, to only have the brilliant and lovely things I said about frogs and rocks and farming. And I would want some of my readers not to look away, to read all my work, even the hardest and darkest. It is not me. But we come from the same places and the same people. It could have been. I am glad I didn’t look away. It has been a very long time since I cried so hard over a book as I did over the opening and closing pages of this book, and also many, many times over the middle, and it was not a very long book. Proceed with caution if at all.

Marvin Kaye, ed. The Fair Folk. Reread. Vividly told tales, most of which did not hit me particularly personally. The opening story from Tanith Lee is a really great example of a story that feels like it is going to be a wonderful story for someone else, a story that will go right to someone else’s heart and stay there. I think it’s easier to recognize those with experience.

Donald Keene, ed., Anthology of Japanese Literature from the Earliest Era to the Mid-Nineteenth Century. Reread. This is something I purchased for a college class and kept. It is not the very last word in Japanese lit, but with twenty years’ experience it turns out to still be a quite decent first word and well worth keeping; there were things I was happy to quote and discuss with friends. I haven’t done a survey of survey anthologies, so I don’t know if this would be the one I would recommend above all others, but as the one I already have on my shelf, it had many things worth reading in it and I am glad to keep giving it space, which is a quite nice feeling. There were several place where I rolled my eyes at Donald Keene himself and his notes–his handling of notes on periods where there were predominantly women authors were not, shall we say, deft and sensitive–but most of the material was the material and could just be enjoyed for that. Good mix of poems, stories, diary excerpts, novel excerpts, play treatments.

Naomi Mitchison, Sea-Green Ribbons. This is a strangely spare novel of a young woman printer during Cromwell’s time. I enjoyed it except for the ending, which I found unsatisfying in its handling of Quakers and slavery, and I spent much of the experience cocking my head and squinting sideways at it and thinking of Gillian Bradshaw’s London in Chains and A Corruptible Crown. They are really, really, really, really similar. Young woman printer, era of Cromwell, sexual trauma, various details…I don’t think that one is cribbed from the other, their style is quite, quite different, and their endings are, and there is something like four times as much of the Bradshaw. It was just very strange. I want more novels of the Interregnum, but it’s okay if the others are not specifically about young women printers with sexual trauma, variety being the spice etc.

Toni Morrison, Jazz. Lots of people failing to make their relationships work, but the language is rich and improvisationally jazzy, very successfully evocative of the ’20s urban setting and newly urbanized Black American culture of the Great Diaspora. If someone other than Toni Morrison had been writing this, the petty, angry despair of the major characters might well have put me off, but Morrison’s writing is so beautiful it was worthwhile for me.

Jim Northrup, Marcie R. Rendon, Linda LeGarde Grover, and Denise Sweet, Nitaawichige: Selected Poetry and Prose by Four Anishinaabe Writers. Highly varied voices and forms, but the traditions they’re drawing on are very recognizably Anishinaabe in their own ways. A very short chapbook, definitely worth the time if you can find it. Hilarity and anger and pathos and beauty all represented here.

Terry Pratchett, I Shall Wear Midnight and The Shepherd’s Crown. Rereads. After long hiatus, I have finished the Tiffany Aching series. Last first: The Shepherd’s Crown is Pratchett’s last book, and you can see that he was not quite done with it, that it is the bones of the book he meant to write rather than the full book, with its gestures toward third-wave feminism and a love letter to the geezerhood the author himself would never achieve. It has some great things to nod at. It makes me wistful. As for I Shall Wear Midnight…I find myself ambivalent about books with the “they persecute us for our virtues because they are stinky jerks” plots right now, and this is one. And yet it is a pretty good one, and sometimes “they” do. And the virtue in particular in this one is being willing to step up and help where help is needed, and I want more of that in fiction and in life.

Frederick Taylor, The Downfall of Money: Germany’s Hyperinflation and the Destruction of the Middle Class. This sounds a bit dry but is very, very human–it’s very much about how the German people experienced the interwar hyperinflationary period, what played into it and what it created. Interesting and a much quicker read than one might expect.

Catherynne M. Valente, Deathless. Reread. This is far and away my favorite Valente novel for adults. I picked it up because I misremembered the time frame–I had thought, for some reason, that the ending was long after it was, deep in the Stalinist period, instead of 1942–and so I thought it might be of interest to my Cold War Fantasy panel at 4th St. Well, this is why we do panel prep, and of course 1942 is the exact right year to end this book. It is so vivid, so food-oriented and so full of myth and relationship and history. It is not for my panel. I still don’t regret the reread.

Martha Wells, All Systems Red. Murderbot! I was one of the last on the Murderbot train, but I do like Murderbot. All Murderbot wants is to be let by to figure things out and watch videos, is this too much to ask? Apparently so because humans, ugh. We are with you, Murderbot! We are with you through the rest of your adventures among humans, ugh, and whoever else you may encounter. Intimate voice far future SF, hurrah, more please.

Date: 2017-06-19 05:02 pm (UTC)
ellarien: Blue/purple pansy (Default)
From: [personal profile] ellarien
(Apparently I no longer have a books icon here.)

I'm always up for a nature ramble around the aishidi'tat, especially if there are mecheiti involved. On the other hand, I'm a bit disappointed that certain new characters are so devoid of individual personality that after the first introduction they're barely mentioned as individuals at all.

Also, I've found that the downside to reading a lot of the Foreigner books in quick succession is that the internal contradictions and retcons become more apparent. I may well do a reread of the last three or four soon, though.

Date: 2017-06-19 05:34 pm (UTC)
arkessian: (Dream Sequence)
From: [personal profile] arkessian
Absolutely, XXX ???

And also the morning walk.
Edited Date: 2017-06-19 05:35 pm (UTC)

Date: 2017-06-19 05:48 pm (UTC)
larryhammer: pen-and-ink drawing of an annoyed woman dressed as a Heian-era male courtier saying "......" (dot dot dot)
From: [personal profile] larryhammer
I have a lot of complex beefs with Keene's anthology, many of them being Keene's commentary. (Most of the others deal with translations, as when I'm familiar with a source, there's an equal chance my reaction will be either "Okay, yeah, I didn't see that before, but you're right," "Meh," or "no no NO NO that's WRONG ALL WRONG!") But as you say, the material itself is there and good and generally well-selected. I keep hoping to find a better general-purpose college anthology to replace it with.

(Icon is from a manga adaptation of a work that's the most outstanding omission I know of, aside from popular songs, of which far more has survived than the general purpose anthologies lead you to believe.)

---L.

Date: 2017-06-19 07:06 pm (UTC)
redbird: full bookshelves and table in a library (books)
From: [personal profile] redbird
I don't think I'm up for that Gruchow memoir right nw, if ever; if I want to look for other of his books, which sound interesting, is there a place you'd recommend starting?

Date: 2017-06-20 12:25 pm (UTC)
redbird: full bookshelves and table in a library (books)
From: [personal profile] redbird
Thanks. I've put in a library request for that.

Date: 2017-06-19 08:43 pm (UTC)
rushthatspeaks: (Default)
From: [personal profile] rushthatspeaks
Oh, hey, you can answer my Cherryh question.

So I bounced hard-- hard enough that I have never finished it-- off Foreigner itself, started at book two, and raced through the rest of the series. When I read Convergence, I sat there at the end going ???? YOU DID NOT RESOLVE THINGS ???? IS THIS MISSING A PAGE, and the only way I can get the end to make sense is if it is some kind of emotional rhyme-callback to the end of Foreigner. I tried yet again to read Foreigner to check; I still can't. Is this what is going on with the ending? Or did she not so much end as just stop?

Date: 2017-06-20 07:16 am (UTC)
arkessian: (Default)
From: [personal profile] arkessian
I bounced off Foreigner until I decided the first two sections didn't exist. It still wasn't the easiest of reads -- so much that Bren (and I) didn't understand but it was Ilsidi that hooked me completely.

Date: 2017-06-20 12:10 am (UTC)
rosefox: Green books on library shelves. (Default)
From: [personal profile] rosefox
Catherynne M. Valente, Deathless. Reread. This is far and away my favorite Valente novel for adults.

I am so pleased to see this.

Date: 2017-06-20 01:08 am (UTC)
armiphlage: (Default)
From: [personal profile] armiphlage
I just started reading All Systems Red, and love it so much!

Date: 2017-06-20 09:37 am (UTC)
supergee: (book)
From: [personal profile] supergee
The Dragon Waiting is the Ford book I respect, but The Scholars of Night is the one I love. The scene where the two women realize they don’t have to kill each other is beautiful.

Date: 2017-06-20 12:28 pm (UTC)
arkessian: (Default)
From: [personal profile] arkessian
I might have to break my rule about not buying physical books any more for The Scholars of Night...
Edited Date: 2017-06-20 12:28 pm (UTC)

Date: 2017-06-21 09:13 pm (UTC)
cloudscudding: Photo of Abra Staffin-Wiebe (Default)
From: [personal profile] cloudscudding
Speaking of panel prep, do you have any particular recommendations for surveillance state SF (near or far-future), written within the last 10 years?

Date: 2017-06-23 08:50 pm (UTC)
cloudscudding: Photo of Abra Staffin-Wiebe (Default)
From: [personal profile] cloudscudding

Doctorow, yes, especially the early stuff. I had forgotten about Icon!

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